Can Trump Save Africa and the African Diaspora After the Legacy of Obama?

Photo Credit: Dr. Roland Holou (www.RolandHolou.com).

 

President Obama might have done what he could to strengthen democracy and boost economic growth in Africa for instance by extending the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) and the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) while investing in the Young African Leaders Initiative (YALI). By organizing the very first U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit, he helped the US to revisit its strategy for Africa. Soon after Obama leaves office, some of his legacies in the USA (e.g. Obamacare, “immigration reform”, Medicaid expansion, minimum wage increase, overtime benefits, paid pregnancy and sick leave, civil rights enforcement, criminal justice reforms, progressive tax reforms, tax credits for low-income people, climate change initiatives, etc.), may be brought down or replaced by something else.

Although several people of African descent including some top civil rights movement leaders are disappointed by the legacy of Mr. Obama, it is worth noticing that he was sandwiched not only between some spiritual and racial strongholds, but also between the strategic forces that brought him to power and the tactical opposition he had to deal with once he managed to enter the White House, which was built by enslaved Africans whose descendants are still struggling in the Americas. The Africans and their stakeholders must reflect on Mr. Obama’s “inability” to do the things that they once thought he could. Unfortunately, many people cannot or do not want to understand that, to some extent, the power of an American President like Mr. Obama is not as strong as that of some Presidents who can even choose to stay in power even if the result of the presidential vote says otherwise. The timing of the presidency of Obama might have also affected his performance as he inherited the worst economic crisis in the USA since the Great Depression of the 1930s. Yet, as he was preparing to leave office, the statistics showed that the US economy is stronger than when he took office. We need to acknowledge Obama for his efforts regardless of his weaknesses, and also thank God for having allowed an African descent to lead the “world’s #1 nation” for 8 years.

Many Africans would have loved that Mrs. Hillary Clinton was elected as the President of the USA in 2016. However, although she won the popular vote by nearly 3 million ballots, the Electoral College favored Mr. Trump. Several people of African descent did not come out to vote for Hillary as they did for Obama, therefore playing a role in the election of Trump who, during his “thank you tour”, acknowledged the African Americans for staying home during the election! The appointment of Mr. Trump could also be a divine setup that fits the end time as prophesied by the renowned Malawian Prophet Shepherd Bushiri (Major1), one of the most successful businessmen and ministers in the world. Do I need to inform you that on January 16, 2017, Major1 publicly said that President Donald Trump is the King Cyrus spoken about in Isaiah 45? Something is going to happen very soon! Surely we are at a defining moment in history!

Unlike Mr. Obama whose election brought hope to Africa and its Diaspora before they realized 8 years later that, one man at the White House cannot save them, the election of Mr. Trump seems to bring fear on some people as if Trump can sink Africa while trying to “Make America Great Again” as emphasized during his controversial and revolutionary campaign. Analyzing Mr. Trump’s campaign and the people he is choosing to fill his cabinet positions, it may sound at first glimpse that his policies may not favor the people of African descent. For instance, some people think that Mr. Trump may reduce or redesign the US aids toward Africa. However, this should not scare anyone. For example, although not a descendant of Africa, President George W. Bush has done a lot of great things for Africa and some well-known African leaders still believe that he has helped Africa more than Mr. Obama whose father is from Kenya. Moreover, although foreign aids benefit some Africans, Africa is not supposed to be living on certain foreign “aids” which usually are strategic loans with high interest that are typically undetectable by the profane. Instead of counting on these “aids”, Africa should be seeking better opportunities that can allow it to put its own people to work and better manage its priceless human and natural resources that some people are still poaching for free. Therefore, let’s hope that, as a businessman who can negotiate deals, Mr. Trump ends up crafting some great agreements that can contribute to the ongoing efforts to advance Africa and its Diaspora.

 

Remember to Love God and His People!

Despite these controversial realities, there is hope for Africa and the African Diaspora if they can understand that their “salvation” will not come from any government in the East or West, but from themselves with the help of God Almighty, who did not predestinate Africa to be the headquarter of poverty despite its rich lands and smart intellectuals. That is why I still believe that the Africans must better partner with each other without forgetting the huge untapped potential of the African Diaspora that some leaders unfortunately refuse to realistically incorporate into their strategic agendas. Instead of putting their hope on people who usually disillusion them, the Africans need to keep up all good fights while counting on the God of Major1 to develop them and the motherland. As for the unspoken racial discrimination and the other forms of injustice, let’s not forget that, there is a God who will judge very soon!

Dr. Roland Holou is a scientist, a businessman, an international consultant and expert in agribusiness, agriculture, agronomy, biotechnology, Diaspora engagement, Africa’s development, international trade and development. To learn more about his work or contact him, please visit www.DiasporaEngager.com, www.AfricanDiasporaLeaders.com and www.RolandHolou.com.

ABCs of a Realistic African Diaspora Engagement

Photo Credit: Dr. Roland Holou (www.RolandHolou.com).

Almost every African country is trying to engage with its diaspora. However, in general, when it comes to how to convince the African diaspora to work with their country of origin, most of the methods used are not working. One of the first things that come to the mind of most Africans living in Africa is to ask the diaspora to help them, forgetting that no one is helping the diaspora for free. In contrast, the first thing that enters the mind of most diasporas is not how to help Africa, but whether Africa knows why they have left the continent and what they are doing/facing abroad!

Do I need to underline that many African immigrants have left the Black Continent because they were chased away by some leaders and sorcerers who, today, are begging them to invest back home? What can’t I say about the massive and forced migration of Africans to America during one of the darkest and wicked ages of human history a few centuries ago? I even wonder how many people realize that the largest African diaspora population is in Brazil! Most African leaders are not trying to better know and understand their diaspora before asking them to come to invest their money in Africa. Sometimes, I even wonder how many African Professionals in the Diaspora are richer than the African leaders who are begging them for money. Worst, some African leaders act as if their diaspora have forgotten the wounds they have suffered in Africa before finding a way to flee the continent of Kwame Nkrumah. Undoubtedly, a lot of basic first steps need to be addressed in order to start aligning the mentality of Africa with that of its diaspora. Otherwise, the synergistic coalition needed for African Diaspora Engagement (www.DiasporaEngager.com/Africa) will continue lacking!

The migration of the diasporas from their home country to their new country of residence is a kind of “divorce or break up” with their roots. Some Africans have had some bad experiences with their own people that they do not even want to reverse their “divorce” with the continent of Nelson Mandela and of Prof Brice Sinsin. Other immigrants have been highly afflicted by the people in their home country that they do not want to hear any request coming from them. No intelligible man dates a woman by starting to ask about anything that is supposed to be last. Moreover, no reasonable man can win back his ex-wife or ex-girlfriend, and vice versa, by starting the conversation with a list of requests or a list of things that the ex must do. Sadly, certain political leaders who orchestrated the migration of their own people cling to power and then, ask their diaspora that they and their ancestors have hunted to come and invest in their country. These types of diaspora engagement cannot work, particularly in the African context where people seem to pull each other toward the bottom of the misery pit. At the same time, many foreign countries are taking advantage of the divergences among the Africans!

 

African Diaspora Engagement Must be like a Love Story. Why? Check out www.DiasporaEngager.com/Africa

The involvement of the diaspora in the development of their home country must follow certain basic rules of courtesy. I believe that Africa and its diaspora need to start “dating” each other in a format similar to that of a man trying to win back his ex-wife or ex-girlfriend, and vice versa. However, while some people that have broken up can easily find new loves, it is not easy for most diasporas to quickly forget their roots and embrace the culture of their new country. This implies that many opportunities still exist to start engaging the African Diasporas in a dialogue with their homeland which dearly needs them. For this dialog to succeed, it must not begin with begging the diaspora to come back to Africa or to invest in Africa. Similarly, the diaspora should not inaugurate this dialog by requesting that the African political leaders change overnight. The African Diasporas need to know that, though their new life abroad has changed the way they used to think, many of their brothers and sisters in Africa still act as if they have no brain or if they cannot get rid of the legacy of the colonial ignorance and slavery. Therefore, the African Diaspora must be tolerant with their own people who need to be willing to realign and renew their mentality so that synergistic coalitions can be fostered in a win-win framework for the advancement of our dear Africa rather than allowing the so-called superpowers to continue poaching their rich lands and mines like the cake of their grandmother or like their heritage or like the field of their slaves that they are still trying to enslave with diverse models of modern technology, negotiation, aids, partnership, and legislation!!!

Please, don’t get me wrong. I am not saying that every African diaspora engagement effort has failed. Indeed, several people and organizations have successfully engaged with Africa and its diaspora in a positive way. Many Africans living in Africa and in the diaspora have also contributed to the development of their homeland. We take advantage of this opportunity to thank those Africans, African diasporas, their friends, partners and stakeholders who have made a positive difference in Africa.

However, after spending years working on the African problems and writing books on African Development, I can conclude that, when it comes to engaging the African diaspora in the development of Africa, ten questions need to be asked first:

  1. Who are the African Diaspora?
  2. Who is who among the African Diaspora?
  3. Where are they living?
  4. What are they doing?
  5. What problems are they facing?
  6. Why did they leave Africa?
  7. How can Africa help them to heal some of their wounds?
  8. What can we do to forgive each other and embrace a new journey of partnership?
  9. How can we partner rather than how can they help us?
  10. How can we initiate this partnership without bringing up money as the first issue?

And these questions must be answered without forgetting the millions of African-Americans, (descendants of the slaves or African Descent individuals of descendants of former slaves), whom some stupid and/or naive Leaders think are not worthy to be called African Diaspora! It is after these questions are sincerely addressed that Africa and its Diaspora can start talking about who can do what for who? Without following these simple strategic steps, the African diaspora will just keep creating thousands of African Diaspora Associations, while the African Political Leaders will keep creating more Political Parties in Africa, yet, sinking Africa, remaining at odds and, therefore, unable to work together to create positive change. If you like this article, you will be also interested in joining the Global Diaspora Engagement Platform and the African Diaspora Platform at http://DiasporaEngager.com/miniRegister. Anyway, I, Dr. Roland Holou www.RolandHolou.com would like to hear from you.

God bless Africa and its People!!!