Strategic War that is Killing Africa and its Diaspora

Photo Credit: Dr. Roland Holou (www.RolandHolou.com).

Through my experience dealing with diasporas across the globe (e.g. https://www.DiasporaEngager.com/map), I have learned something very shocking about Africa and America that I would like to share with you today. I noticed that some diaspora groups and countries are very connected and as tightly knit as a sweater. When I realized that these groups were successful in helping their diaspora and home country, I thought to myself: why isn’t this the case for Africa?

For many years, I used to think that the African leaders, politicians, and intellectuals were the main cause of the African problem. In 2008, I  published a book in France titled “La Faillite des Cadres et Intellectuels Africains (The Failure of the African Intellectuals). After being recently involved in several diaspora initiatives, I realized that what causes the African leaders to cling to power and ignore their own intellectuals who, in the end, are leaving Africa to go abroad, is also causing the African Diaspora to fight among each other, and wanting to raise themselves above each other in a way that most of the African diaspora initiatives are not in sync. The Africans tend to always put themselves first, and in the process, they discourage and put down anyone who may dare to do something similar. While other nations are fighting the ideologies that should free Africa, the Africans themselves keep creating and worsening divisions they have been subjected to by colonial powers. African efforts lack coordination and cooperation at many levels. The African Diaspora and African leaders are not ready to engage with one another in a realistic way that can overcome 21st-century global mindsets and customs that still try to hold back the Black community, despite having a Black President at the White House.

The mentality that caused the Europeans to go to Africa to divide it, to catch our grandfathers and force them into slavery (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlantic_slave_trade), is sadly still within many of our own African leaders and the African Diaspora. That evil spirit is causing many Africans to sabotage one another, and to refuse to collaborate with or help each other. That is why Africa is unable to unite and use its rich lands and resources to develop. I found it fascinating that some Africans born in Africa do not even consider African Americans (descendants of former slaves) to be a part of the African diaspora. Sometimes, I am shocked that while talking about race in America, there is a difference between African, Black, African American, Afrodescendant, and Negro. Yet, they are the same people who are struggling to free their brothers and sisters from some historical strongholds.

During the building of the global diaspora database (www.DiasporaEngager.com/directory and https://www.DiasporaEngager.com/map), I engaged with several diaspora associations across the globe. I noticed that there are many African diaspora clubs. The Africans gather themselves in groups that discuss diverse forms of doctrines without truly thinking about how to help others even their own people. In those diaspora groups or networks, some Africans surround themselves with people who can help them to find a piece of the pie and eat it together. After being involved in decision making at the highest level, I found it amazing that in America, many of the African Diaspora’s initiatives by Africans from Africa are not welcomed by some leaders in the African American communities (https://www.diasporaengager.com/American), and vice versa. The Africans need to learn to work more cooperatively and to stop to be victims of their past historical wounds. The African Diasporas are so dispersed and divided that IF they cannot learn HOW to better work with one another in the midst of their divergences and geographical constraints, they can never sustainably improve their situation.

 

The most developed countries do NOT like each other, BUT they know how to meet in their clubs of G7, G10, G20, Gxyz, etc. to work together and push their agenda forward. While the African Nations are trying hard to be included in these clubs, they have refused for more than 50 years to unite themselves to form a realistic African Union. Similarly, some African leaders tend to reject the potential of their diaspora intellectuals in order to focus on their own selfish agendas that help them acquire money; create projects and/or get consulting fees, or keep their power until they die on their throne before their children take over by picking up the leadership heritage. Though certain African Leaders cite the western countries as the root of their poverty, they crush their own people with policies, sometimes in the name of democracy that some people think is sufficient to develop Africa https://DiasporaEngager.com/extPage/DemocracyGovernance!

 

Likewise, the African diasporas “ignore” one another just as some developed countries technically overlook Africa’s best interests. For instance, Benin Republic—my country of origin—is among the smallest countries in the world. We have more than 150 political parties in Benin and there are several diaspora associations from Benin in America; however, they are NOT working together. Everybody wants to be the Boss and at the same time, some western powers have put Africa in a big box that it is struggling to escape. This backward mentality is everywhere amongst most African nations and diasporas. As if this mentality is not enough, the African leaders are not listening to the intellectuals they have at their own universities. Indeed, they have chased away many professionals https://www.diasporaengager.com/BrainDrain and imprisoned those they do not like. Africa claims that it wants to reverse the brain drain; however, it forgets that the migration of these brains is feeding the economy and the technology of western countries that Africa asks to fund the African projects where money is spoiled and wasted as if it was the sand of the seashore. Are the Africans implying that the World Bank was right when it argued for many years that Africa does not need University Intellectuals? For instance, the African Leaders need to understand that listening to their own intellectuals and investing in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics … must be the first priority in their budget. Otherwise, we are just programming and prolonging poverty in Africa, although some people use statistics to show that Africa is prospering. Money-oriented conferences organized on behalf of Africa will not improve the African situation. Indeed, if we cannot change the mentality of the African Leaders, we cannot win this battle. African leaders need to follow the example of the African intellectuals who are making a positive difference such as Prof Brice Sinsin (http://www.BriceSinsin.com)

Furthermore, we need to be more honest with Africa and with one another. For instance, members of the African Diasporas (https://www.diasporaengager.com/Africa) are very smart, but NOT very rich. Yet, when they go to Africa, they behave as if they are billionaires abroad. This behavior ignites excitement and adventure in the minds of talented Africans, who then leave Africa only to realize that life abroad is not always easy, nor the heaven that some people describe. We need to start being honest with our people in Africa. When we want to talk about African Diaspora Engagement, let’s not think too much about MONEY, and let’s refrain from turning to BIG financial institutions for funding. Money has never been Africa’s problem and it will never be the solution. If the African Diaspora can help one another without spreading abroad their backward mentality—which is not different from the mindset of the nations that try to oppress them—, I (www.RolandHolou.com) believe we can better forge strong coalitions that can help free Africa, the poor, the needy, and the afflicted from being controlled by the power of other nations who are trying to develop themselves as well.

Some people may wonder why I am speaking as if I hate Africa. The fact of the matter is that I love Africa very much and I still have brothers and sisters on the Black continent who cannot even comprehend the reality of life abroad even if I risk my life to tell them the truth. I was born and raised in the Benin Republic (West Africa) before I moved to the USA many years ago. I am privileged to have tasted life in Africa before migrating to the USA, where I got my Ph.D. in Plant, Insect and Microbial Sciences. I have been working and publishing books and articles about Africa for more than 15 years. It is my love for Africa and the global diaspora that caused me to create DiasporaEngager, the International Diaspora Engagement Platform www.DiasporaEngager.com. Today, I am pleased to inform you that the platform is growing quickly and is being used in many countries. We also completed the most comprehensive diaspora database and diaspora map, which anyone can access by creating a free account at www.DiasporaEngager.com/miniRegister and then visit at https://diasporaengager.com/map/. DiasporaEngager is helping people and nations to address some of the problems mentioned above http://diasporasnews.com/how-does-diasporaengager-help-individuals-organizations-and-nations/.

 May God bless Africa and its Diasporas.

Causes and Solutions to African Impoverishment and Underdevelopment

Photo Credit: Dr. Roland Holou (www.RolandHolou.com).

After decades of independence, economic development in African countries continues to lag behind. However, several models and ideologies of development have been applied. Are these ideologies and models inadequate in Africa’s specific case or are the real causes of Africa’s failures due to different factors? Considering the complex process of development, the answer to this question is not simple. In trying to find a real solution to the problem, the importance of identifying the source of poverty in Africa is very relevant.

In his latest book (A continent in tears: The origin of Africa’s collapse and how to reverse it), Dr. Roland Holou thoroughly analyzed the real evils that undermine development in African countries. After reviewing the literature on Africa’s development and the misconduct of African officials, the importance of human resources and knowledge in the process of Africa’s development has been revealed. The in-depth analysis focused on the failures of the education systems, lack of thought, problems with intelligence and creativity, scientific research, negativity, rote learning (mechanically memorizing information without truly learning how to apply it), corruption, the mismanagement of Africa’s natural resources, reproduction, witchcraft, politics, trade unionism, ignorance, the African mentality, accountability, the awareness of Africans, corruption of foreign powers, the brain drain, and so on. Examples of elites that Africa needs are included as well.

When dictators come to power, they do as they please; when politicians have power, they hardly listen to skilled workers; when skilled workers take power, they act as if everything is technical. Moreover, radical trade unionism and political opposition are destroying Africa. Many do not want to contribute to successful initiatives, preferring instead to advance their own interests. What’s worse is the erroneous African mentality that makes development and progress impossible. While skilled, able workers who could make a difference are out of work, lazy and unqualified individuals are promoted to important positions by their relatives in power. Meanwhile, the expenses of the “great” have robbed Africa of the little that is available, all to the detriment of the poor, “innocent” farmers who are dying under the afternoon sun. With the help of foreign powers and politicians, African officials have effectively beaten Africa down. Indeed, Africa suffers from an intellectual, demographic, and spiritual crisis. The decline of Africa is due not only to its poor management and governance but also to the acts of evil inflicted upon the continent. From households to the very top of the state, Africans are faced with major challenges. Many Africans are afraid to think or do not want to think; many are afraid to speak, do not want to speak, or cannot speak; many are afraid to act or do not want to act; many leaders are corrupt and/or do not want to learn; many have knowledge but do not want to or cannot apply their knowledge; many religious figures are so attached to narrow visions that they have disregarded the management of cities and politics. Above all else, intellectuals are often spurned by those in charge. When certain individuals want to contribute to society or become something, they are suppressed and rejected. Many skills are scorned; great minds are rarely encouraged or heard. Though several politicians do have some skilled knowledge, recognized experts and skilled workers generally do not want to get involved in politics.

Moreover, in many education systems, diplomas are not always symbols of knowledge that will lead to positive action toward development. Indeed, Africans distribute and collect many useless degrees. Many graduates claim to be educated when in reality their credentials are a sham. Africa trains too many scholars—parrots whose heads are filled with useless theories and words—who are unproductive and ultimately do not contribute anything of value to society. There are very few exceptions to this rule. Meanwhile, uncontrolled reproduction is enhancing poverty and other problems pertaining to underdevelopment at a faster rate than preexisting problems can be solved. Indeed, polygamy and certain sexual perversions not only contribute to underdevelopment in Africa, but also to the culture of African destitution.

Additionally, African intellectuals are under the influence of spiritual factions that often impede efforts toward development. Unfortunately, the classic debates surrounding underdevelopment in Africa have always ignored the spiritual dimension of the problem. Undoubtedly, developed countries had advantages and other assets that aided them in their growth. These countries have had their Enlightenment period; great minds have worked to put these nations on the right path. Today, Africa’s best minds are afraid to even remain on the continent. Due to this massive brain drain, there are real problems pertaining to coordination, awareness, accountability, and intelligent, rational application of development strategies in African nations.

In an attempt to find a lasting solution to the impoverishment of Africa and to put the continent on the path to prosperity, Dr. Roland Holou (www.RolandHolou.com) has suggested pertinent and practical reforms in his book that should be initiated. This book provides anyone who is concerned with the development in Africa valuable information and instruction on how to take action. The ideas proposed in this book could be applied to other continents as well, as these same issues occur outside of Africa.

A dual citizen of the USA and the Benin Republic, Dr. Roland Holou has a doctorate in plant sciences, entomology, and microbiology. He is an agricultural engineer and a specialist in environmental development and management. He also holds a diploma in Rural Development and is the Founder and CEO of DiasporaEngager (www.DiasporaEngager.com), the world’s #1 diaspora engagement platform. To learn more about Dr. Roland Holou and his books, or to contact him.

Biography of the Famous Intellectual Brice Augustin Sinsin

Photo Credit: Dr. Roland Holou (www.RolandHolou.com).

Engaging with the international diaspora implies also helping the diaspora to better know the people that they left behind in their home country. It also implies assisting those in the country of residence of the diaspora to value, celebrate and cherish the good achievements of their peers who are succeeding. When it comes to the contemporary African intellectuals, scientists, leaders, developers, managers, reformers, and educators, one name has been locally and internationally leading the list: Prof Brice Augustin Sinsin.

His sense of teamwork, franchise, and reputation allowed him to extensively build a strong network of collaborators across the globe from Belgium, Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, Cameroon, China, France, Gabon, Germany, Ghana, Iran, Kenya, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Namibia, Netherlands, Niger, Nigeria, Republic of Central Africa, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Africa, South Korea, Sweden, Togo, Uganda, United Kingdom, USA, etc. He has supervised more than 50 Ph.D. Students in Africa, Europe, America, Asia, etc. Prof Brice Sinsin is the Director of the “Laboratory of Applied Ecology”.Brice Augustin Sinsin was born in 1959, a year before the independence of his native country, Benin Republic (West Africa). Despite the challenges surrounding his childhood, Brice Sinsin worked very hard until he earned a Ph.D. with distinction in Agronomy at the Free University of Brussels (Belgium) in 1993. Having overcome every challenge on his way, Prof Brice Sinsin is today internationally applauded not only for his scientific achievements but also for his management and leadership ability that has been best known after he became the Rector/Chancellor of the University of Abomey Calavi (UAC), the biggest university (consisting of more than 100,000 students) of Benin. During his tenure at the head of UAC, Prof Sinsin won several awards including the “Best Manager of the Year in Science and Education” in 2013 from the International Socrates Committee in Europe. In less than 4 years, his undeniable leadership and reforms brought more than a dozen international prizes and awards to UAC.


A few days ago, the Biography of Prof Brice Sinsin was published. The 18 chapters of that book revealed the true facets and secrets of his masterful journey. Indeed, Brice Sinsin is a Beninese, a beloved father, a tireless leader, a rigorous developer, a generous educator, an undeniable reformer, and a proven scientist that has braved everything in his life, from childhood to the top of modern science where the sweat of his brow raised him to an internationally acclaimed reputation. Forerunner of a new approach to science policy for the emergence and development of nations, Prof Brice Sinsin is a model that all generations are invited to imitate and seek to surpass. His biography explains how this Beninese works on the basis of principles and passions that hide the code of his success that many seek to emulate without wanting to pay the price. In the 300 page biography, Prof Sinsin also proposes strategies to reform the African democracy and constitutions to suit the needs of the African people, learn from traditional leadership systems in Africa, make African countries more national and patriotic, reform politics in Africa and better train the African diplomats. The author ended the biography with a critical conclusion and a fervent prayer. To learn more about this biography, please visit www.BriceSinsin.com. To get your copy of the biography, please click here:

This biography was written by Dr. Roland Holou (www.RolandHolou.com), a scientist, a businessman, a published author, and an international consultant. He obtained his Bachelor’s Degree in Agronomy and his Master of Science Degree in Agricultural Engineering at the University of Abomey Calavi in Benin. He has a Ph.D. in Plant, Insect and Microbial Sciences at the University of Missouri (USA) where he graduated as the Doctoral Marshal (first of his class). Roland Holou is the Founder and CEO of DiasporaEngager (www.DiasporaEngager.com), the premier global diaspora engagement network platform that connects the international diasporas to each other and to opportunities anywhere.

Biographie du Réformateur Africain Brice Augustin Sinsin

Photo Credit: Dr. Roland Holou (www.RolandHolou.com).

Au temps des philosophes antiques, l’Afrique était le centre du savoir. Ai-je besoin de vous rappeler la place des penseurs Africains dans l’histoire de la science ? De nos jours, un autre vent scientifique, réformateur et développeur est en train de souffler au Bénin, le quartier latin de l’Afrique. La biographie du leader, Brice Augustin Sinsin (www.BriceSinsin.com) capitalise les faits se rapportant à ce vent réformateur qui est applaudi des 4 coins du globe.

Pourquoi Dr Ir. Roland Holou a-t-il décidé faire la biographie du Prof. Brice Sinsin? Prof. Guy Apollinaire Mensah repondit à cette question dans la préface du livre en soulignant que « Dr Holou veut faire découvrir au lecteur toutes les facettes du parcours magistral et majestueux de ce Professeur hors pair qui devient un modèle que la génération montante et de relève est invitée à imiter et chercher à surpasser ». Dans cette biographie, l’auteur ne conduit pas le lecteur dans un labyrinthe de la vie de Prof. Sinsin, mais il lui souligne et lui montre plutôt comment un homme, un scientifique et un vrai passionné peut se tracer une ligne de conduite et se doter de principe afin de surmonter tous les obstacles jonchant son chemin en se remettant tout temps en cause pour atteindre son but et obtenir la satisfaction et le réconfort moral du travail bien accompli.

Sinsin Augustin Brice est venu au monde le 03 mars 1959 à Djidja, à la veille de l’indépendance du Dahomey qui, plus tard, devint «République Populaire du Bénin» sous le règne du Président Mathieu Kérékou, puis «République du Bénin» avec l’arrivée du Renouveau Démocratique. Le lecteur de cette biographie saura que Prof. Sinsin est reconnu comme celui qui 1) aime lire et respecter les hommes et les normes sociales, 2) aime rendre compte des ressources à lui allouer, 3) aime écouter son prochain pour pouvoir bien l’aider, 4) veille sur ces principes dans une simplicité et une ouverture d’esprit avérées, 5) aime la culture du travail, de la confiance et de la libéralité, 6) dédaigne les amateurs des problèmes, 7) déteste le gain facile, 8) aime bien payer ses ouvriers et collaborateurs, 9) a trop œuvré pour la promotion des bras valides, 10) adore la collaboration avec les autres et le travail en équipe, 11) a formé une kyrielle de cadres pour le développement de nombreux pays, 12) est l’un des rares cerveaux ayant consacré leur vie à protéger et à valoriser les ressources naturelles (végétaux et animaux sauvages) et les humains …

Cette biographie explique comment cet Africain fonctionne sur la base de passions et principes qui cachent le code de sa réussite que beaucoup cherchent à imiter sans vouloir payer le prix. Il propose aussi des stratégies pour réformer la démocratie et les constitutions africaines en vue de les adapter aux besoins du peuple africain, tirer leçons des systèmes de chefferies traditionnelles en Afrique, faire des pays africains des États-Nations, reformer la politique en Afrique et la formation des diplomates Africains. L’auteur termine cet ouvrage par une conclusion critique et une prière fervente.Le temps manquerait s’il fallait énumérer le nombre de dossiers et de cadres que le Prof Sinsin a défendus et promus. Les Béninois sont très intelligents certes, mais s’ils décident d’employer leur intelligence pour vous nuire, vous êtes grillés. Ai-je besoin de vous rappeler ce que disait le célèbre philosophe français Emmanuel Mounier bien avant les indépendances du Dahomey (actuel Bénin) en 1960 : « Le Dahomey est le quartier latin de l’Afrique. Mais cet intellectualisme fait de méchanceté et de mesquinerie est de nature à retarder le développement du pays». Sans l’intervention et la libéralité du Prof Sinsin A. Brice, plusieurs cadres Béninois seraient bloqués par ce que Maître Robert Dossou qualifie de ‘‘Béninoiserie’’, ce jeu de blocage des uns et des autres bien reconnu à certains méchants génies Béninois qui aiment aussi compliquer les choses avec la sorcellerie, le Vodou et bien d’autres forces spirituelles que je ne saurais vraiment expliquer dans l’espace de cette biographie. Malgré ces menaces et actions parfois occultes, le professeur Sinsin a toujours le souci de voir ses étudiants réussir.

L’auteur de cette biographie, Dr Roland Holou, est un citoyen Américain et Béninois, scientifique, écrivain, businessman, développeur, et consultant international. Roland a obtenu un doctorat en sciences végétales, entomologie et microbiologie aux États-Unis. Il est récipiendaire de plusieurs prix et titres honorifiques dont: “Top Ranked U.S. Executive Award”, “Who’s Who in the World”, “Who’s Who in America”. Il est le Fondateur et PDG de DiasporaEngager, www.DiasporaEngager.com, la première plateforme mondiale des diasporas et parties prenantes. Pour savoir plus sur Roland, visiter www.RolandHolou.com

Involvement of the Diaspora in Healthcare Reform in Africa

Photo Credit: Dr. Roland Holou (www.RolandHolou.com).

Without a doubt, Africa is being torn apart by many political problems indeed, but the recent Ebola outbreak was very catastrophic. This sad situation that affected some countries such as Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea, etc., is calling for action. If the world keeps ignoring the neglected disease in Africa, it will be surprised by the cost of the consequences.

Efforts are being made to try to help the afflicted countries to recover from the Ebola devastation. So far, more than $50 million has been raised for the affected countries. The African Union has called all countries to cancel the debt of the countries affected by Ebola. Right now, although we do not hear about Ebola as much and the crisis is fading, we should not think that Ebola is cured and the epidemic will not happen again! Ebola has been going back and forth for many decades. A global strategy is needed to ensure this problem is tackled from all possible angles.

Summits and other types of conferences have been done to try to address the Ebola crisis. On February 6, 2015, a historical Forum was held on Africa Healthcare Reform at the African Union Mission in Washington DC. That meeting drew some of the top African professionals and stakeholders operating in the healthcare field in the USA. DiasporaEngager https://www.diasporaengager.com was privileged to be invited at that high-level meeting led by Mr. Melvin Foote, the founder and president of Constituency for Africa (CFA). The need is to “collaborate and cooperate, not just help” Africa, as mentioned by Dr. Roscoe M. Moore Jr. (retired US Assistant Surgeon General) who is the Interim Chair of CFA and also the Chair of the Africa Healthcare Infrastructure Committee.

Unfortunately, many African leaders are not considering healthcare as a top priority. At the same time, many nonprofits funded by Western countries are dominating the healthcare system in African without really contributing to the true solution. Therefore, it is imperative that the African governments give a priority to healthcare issues in their national medical budget. Additionally, African governments must better regulate their healthcare system so that outsiders do not continue to dictate what needs to be done. To succeed in this effort, religious practices and faith actions must also be considered and fostered. To fully address the issues, efforts must be made regarding: The statistics of the African professionals living in the diaspora are alarming. As of 2015, more than 135,000 doctors and nurses trained in Africa are living in the diaspora. More than 50,000 Nigerian doctors are living in North America alone. It is shocking to know that there are more medical doctors from Benin living in France than doctors living in Benin. The sad thing is that “people don’t listen to Africa and its diaspora, because the Africans don’t have a voice”, said Prof. Allen Herman, founding Dean of the National School of Public Health in South Africa. The minds and the ideas to reform healthcare in Africa are not what lack. One of the problems is that many outsiders of Africa do not want to empower the identity of the Africans, but instead they prefer the Africans to celebrate theirs. However, as pointed out by Dr. Julius Garvey (a USA board-certified surgeon and son of the legendary pan-Africanist Marcus Garvey Jr.), the African healthcare problem is not just a brain drain issue. Even if all the diaspora healthcare workers return to Africa, it will solve just about 10% of the human resource problem. A paradigm ship is needed, and the colonial healthcare system in Africa needs to be reformed. Africa must design a curriculum so that its healthcare specialists can be trained quickly rather than trying to follow the long medical training period required in western countries. Instead of trying to train “degree nurses”, Africa must train its healthcare personnel to address the need quickly.

  • African healthcare system strengthening
  • Healthcare system management
  • Testing centers and traditional medicine
  • Leadership and Behavior changes
  • Training of healthcare workers
  • Healthcare job creation
  • Media education about healthcare
  • Investment programs
  • Reform of healthcare professional traveling requirement
  • Agriculture implication in healthcare
  • Center for Disease Control creation

African Diaspora must take the lead to reform Healthcare Infrastructure in Africa. And this reform must be done in partnership with Africa, which needs to take action and not just be waiting for free gifts from some westerners who, oftentimes, do not have Africa’s interest as their main priorities. DiasporaEngager salutes the creation of the Africa Healthcare Infrastructure Committee. To learn more about the African Healthcare Infrastructure Forum & Brainstorm that took place at the African Union Mission in Washington DC on Feb 6, 2015, please visit:

The African Healthcare Infrastructure Forum & Brainstorm(Part 1)

 

The African Healthcare Infrastructure Forum & Brainstorm (Part 3)

Let’s keep in mind that Ebola is just one of the major diseases that are devastating to Africa. What can we say about HIV, Malaria, and Tuberculosis? If you want to join us in this effort to engage the global diaspora in the development of their country, please sign up at www.DiasporaEngager.com/miniRegister.

ABCs of a Realistic African Diaspora Engagement

Photo Credit: Dr. Roland Holou (www.RolandHolou.com).

Almost every African country is trying to engage with its diaspora. However, in general, when it comes to how to convince the African diaspora to work with their country of origin, most of the methods used are not working. One of the first things that come to the mind of most Africans living in Africa is to ask the diaspora to help them, forgetting that no one is helping the diaspora for free. In contrast, the first thing that enters the mind of most diasporas is not how to help Africa, but whether Africa knows why they have left the continent and what they are doing/facing abroad!

Do I need to underline that many African immigrants have left the Black Continent because they were chased away by some leaders and sorcerers who, today, are begging them to invest back home? What can’t I say about the massive and forced migration of Africans to America during one of the darkest and wicked ages of human history a few centuries ago? I even wonder how many people realize that the largest African diaspora population is in Brazil! Most African leaders are not trying to better know and understand their diaspora before asking them to come to invest their money in Africa. Sometimes, I even wonder how many African Professionals in the Diaspora are richer than the African leaders who are begging them for money. Worst, some African leaders act as if their diaspora have forgotten the wounds they have suffered in Africa before finding a way to flee the continent of Kwame Nkrumah. Undoubtedly, a lot of basic first steps need to be addressed in order to start aligning the mentality of Africa with that of its diaspora. Otherwise, the synergistic coalition needed for African Diaspora Engagement (www.DiasporaEngager.com/Africa) will continue lacking!

The migration of the diasporas from their home country to their new country of residence is a kind of “divorce or break up” with their roots. Some Africans have had some bad experiences with their own people that they do not even want to reverse their “divorce” with the continent of Nelson Mandela and of Prof Brice Sinsin. Other immigrants have been highly afflicted by the people in their home country that they do not want to hear any request coming from them. No intelligible man dates a woman by starting to ask about anything that is supposed to be last. Moreover, no reasonable man can win back his ex-wife or ex-girlfriend, and vice versa, by starting the conversation with a list of requests or a list of things that the ex must do. Sadly, certain political leaders who orchestrated the migration of their own people cling to power and then, ask their diaspora that they and their ancestors have hunted to come and invest in their country. These types of diaspora engagement cannot work, particularly in the African context where people seem to pull each other toward the bottom of the misery pit. At the same time, many foreign countries are taking advantage of the divergences among the Africans!

 

African Diaspora Engagement Must be like a Love Story. Why? Check out www.DiasporaEngager.com/Africa

The involvement of the diaspora in the development of their home country must follow certain basic rules of courtesy. I believe that Africa and its diaspora need to start “dating” each other in a format similar to that of a man trying to win back his ex-wife or ex-girlfriend, and vice versa. However, while some people that have broken up can easily find new loves, it is not easy for most diasporas to quickly forget their roots and embrace the culture of their new country. This implies that many opportunities still exist to start engaging the African Diasporas in a dialogue with their homeland which dearly needs them. For this dialog to succeed, it must not begin with begging the diaspora to come back to Africa or to invest in Africa. Similarly, the diaspora should not inaugurate this dialog by requesting that the African political leaders change overnight. The African Diasporas need to know that, though their new life abroad has changed the way they used to think, many of their brothers and sisters in Africa still act as if they have no brain or if they cannot get rid of the legacy of the colonial ignorance and slavery. Therefore, the African Diaspora must be tolerant with their own people who need to be willing to realign and renew their mentality so that synergistic coalitions can be fostered in a win-win framework for the advancement of our dear Africa rather than allowing the so-called superpowers to continue poaching their rich lands and mines like the cake of their grandmother or like their heritage or like the field of their slaves that they are still trying to enslave with diverse models of modern technology, negotiation, aids, partnership, and legislation!!!

Please, don’t get me wrong. I am not saying that every African diaspora engagement effort has failed. Indeed, several people and organizations have successfully engaged with Africa and its diaspora in a positive way. Many Africans living in Africa and in the diaspora have also contributed to the development of their homeland. We take advantage of this opportunity to thank those Africans, African diasporas, their friends, partners and stakeholders who have made a positive difference in Africa.

However, after spending years working on the African problems and writing books on African Development, I can conclude that, when it comes to engaging the African diaspora in the development of Africa, ten questions need to be asked first:

  1. Who are the African Diaspora?
  2. Who is who among the African Diaspora?
  3. Where are they living?
  4. What are they doing?
  5. What problems are they facing?
  6. Why did they leave Africa?
  7. How can Africa help them to heal some of their wounds?
  8. What can we do to forgive each other and embrace a new journey of partnership?
  9. How can we partner rather than how can they help us?
  10. How can we initiate this partnership without bringing up money as the first issue?

And these questions must be answered without forgetting the millions of African-Americans, (descendants of the slaves or African Descent individuals of descendants of former slaves), whom some stupid and/or naive Leaders think are not worthy to be called African Diaspora! It is after these questions are sincerely addressed that Africa and its Diaspora can start talking about who can do what for who? Without following these simple strategic steps, the African diaspora will just keep creating thousands of African Diaspora Associations, while the African Political Leaders will keep creating more Political Parties in Africa, yet, sinking Africa, remaining at odds and, therefore, unable to work together to create positive change. If you like this article, you will be also interested in joining the Global Diaspora Engagement Platform and the African Diaspora Platform at http://DiasporaEngager.com/miniRegister. Anyway, I, Dr. Roland Holou www.RolandHolou.com would like to hear from you.

God bless Africa and its People!!!

 

Seeking a job or wanting to recruit international applicants?

Photo Credit: Dr. Roland Holou (www.RolandHolou.com).

In our previous article, we tried to explain the unemployment problems of the diaspora and immigrants. We also explored what DiasporaEngager (the International Diaspora Engagement Platform) is doing to help solve those problems. Today, we will give more insights into other strategies the unemployed people and their countries can use to alleviate unemployment and put more people to work!

After someone gets a job, it is also important to keep it and perform it without much labor issues. Sometimes, diaspora members encounter discrimination problems related to age, race, gender, disability, religion, politics, … , for which they need professional assistance (e.g. legal services or counseling). DiasporaEngager connects people with legal professionals that can provide labor services.

Helping some qualified immigrants who want to return to their country of origin can help solve the unemployment problem. Unfortunately, it is difficult for the migrants or the diaspora to go back to their home countries which, usually, at their turn, are not taping into the huge potential of their own professionals living abroad!

Every country needs to start involving their diaspora in key sectors such as education, research, development. Those who have an education in science and technology can also use their knowledge to find and engage with opportunities in their current countries and also in their country of origin where those skills are oftentimes more needed.

At the same time, volunteering must be encouraged so, that even without pay, people can utilize their strength and talents to help others. For instance, the diaspora can volunteer their potential to advance their countries which they can also represent at strategic places abroad.

The joblessness problem can be alleviated if the diaspora can also provide their skills to their home countries in consulting and partnership. The sad observation is that many countries are not investing in their diaspora and worse, they are not taking advantage of the huge consulting potential of their international professionals living abroad!  Similarly, the international pundits and their home countries must design ways so that the diaspora can be strategically used to advocate for the development of their native nation. By doing so, the unemployment rate among the natives and the immigrants can be significantly reduced, while knowledge more valued.

Last but not least, those who are living abroad need to be honest with their relatives who are still in their home country. Sometimes, many people move abroad seeking a better life that they never find because a relative or a friend abroad has given them false advice or information about career opportunities overseas. It is dangerous for the global diaspora to keep their own people in the darkness of reality abroad. At the same time, it is very important for the diaspora and the immigrants to help each other in a way that those who have succeeded assist the new arrivals!

Those who have succeeded can share their stories and strategies they used so that others who are trying to follow their path can reach their dreams without many struggles. These are some of the strategies DiasporaEngager is using to help people and their nations to find and engage in a way that can develop them.

If you would like to join us in this effort and/or use DiasporaEngager’s platform to solve a problem, please register a free account at www.DiasporaEngager.com/miniRegister. For any questions and or suggestions, please email us.

Why the high unemployment of the diaspora and immigrants?

Photo Credit: Dr. Roland Holou (www.RolandHolou.com).

In every nation, people are looking for jobs. Unfortunately, it takes more than getting a great degree to find a comfortable job. Generally, people move to new places to have a better career or future. Several people have had to move to a foreign country before finding their dream job! In other words, countless immigrants have succeeded in their profession abroad much more than they would have had if they have stayed in their country of origin.

When certain immigrants and/or international people migrate to new countries, the challenge of finding a new career path is sometimes very difficult. This is because international people must compete against native professionals in the job market. When cultural barriers and linguistic trials come into play, launching and promoting the diaspora in the workplace can be very tough.

This global problem is more alarming for the immigrants and refugees, even if they are well educated, legal, properly documented, well qualified, and ready to work. For instance, in a foreign country, the need and pressure to satisfy the basic daily needs cause some diaspora members to focus on temporary and easily-accessible opportunities, therefore neglecting to strategically work on long term plans that could allow them to achieve their dreams. At times, job opportunities are available, but job seekers just don’t know how and where to find them. This is because many jobs are posted on closed networks, websites or career placement centers that are hard to reach particularly by the least informed people. Additionally, accessing recruiters can be challenging if the job applicants must pay a fee before finding the opening positions. Regrettably, few people really take advantage of career opportunities in their surrounding areas, and consequently, people are not always able to reach their full potential.

A solution is needed for this global problem. That’s where DiasporaEngager (www.DiasporaEngager.com) comes in. Indeed, amongst many other things, DiasporaEngager is an international platform that aims at helping people to have direct and better access to career development possibilities wherever they live. This global diaspora platform also helps them to find tools to strategize and progressively work toward their career goals. DiasporaEngager allows career recruiting services to post their job vacancies so that they can be matched with appropriate and qualified job seekers. Moreover, DiasporaEngager connects job seekers to professional training centers that will help them define, improve, and succeed in their career path. 

Other job search and placement opportunities or services available on DiasporaEngager include job search tips, job recommendations, CV or resume improvement, and internships, fellowships that can help someone to get a job or a promotion. On that platform, people who need mentoring can find others who can mentor them, whereas those who have skills and expertise can mentor the needy as well. For instance, the diasporas often need help to find the appropriate job while at the same time, they can assist people from their home country in resolving some professional needs.

In our next post, we will dive into more strategies to help address the unemployment challenge! Meanwhile, if you would like to join us in this effort and/or use DiasporaEngager’s platform to solve a problem, please register a free account at www.DiasporaEngager.com/miniRegister. For any questions and or suggestions, please email [email protected]

Stay tuned!

How to Help Immigrants and Diaspora to Return Back Home

Photo Credit: Dr. Roland Holou (www.RolandHolou.com).

In our previous article (Why Immigrants and Diasporas Cannot Easily Return Back Home), we discussed how difficult it is for immigrants and diaspora members to return back home. Today, we will explore some of the strategies DiasporaEngager is taking to help the diaspora and their people to return back home if needed.

DiasporaEngager aims at facilitating dialog and negotiations between the international diasporas and their countries. DiasporaEngager encourages governments affected by brain drain to create new programs to assist their diaspora to return home. Because the diaspora studied in a higher and more advanced system, a kind of positive discrimination (giving them special favors and benefits) needs to be created to distinguish them from their peers who stayed home. DiasporaEngager encourages the creation of a new type of non-profit (Non-Governmental Organization) to facilitate that type of investment. Expatriating immigrants,  closing borders, or granting work permits to the so-called illegal immigrants cannot solve this migratory grand challenge.

DiasporaEngager provides an avenue to locate the parties interested in such opportunities and helps them to start the communication or partnership required to define the conditions and context of the return of qualified Diaspora members to their original country. People interested in returning back to their home country as well as the nations and organizations that would like to encourage that move should register an account on www.DiasporaEngager.com. The institutions or organizations in the home country should define the opportunities that they can provide so that the Diaspora can search and match their expectations with what is available in their home country. DiasporaEngager provides the environment to facilitate that dialog and works together with local and international agencies involved in migration, traveling, or development to harness any opportunities that can assist anyone in this transition.

 

DiasporaEngager:  The world’s #1 platform that really helps immigrants and diasporas to find opportunities to stay abroad or to return back home.

DiasporaEngager works with local businesses to hire diaspora members and to help them return to their home country to work for them. Companies in the diaspora’s host country can hire diaspora members and send them to work for them in their home country. After knowing the diaspora member’s work ethic, businesses in the host country of the diaspora can better trust not just the qualifications they hold, but also the confidence that can be put in them for the best interest of the business. Sometimes, many multinational companies would like to hire or subcontract with other international businesses, but because of a lack of knowing the culture and competency of other organizations abroad, it is more difficult. If the diasporas returning back home can be involved in this kind of international transaction they can be the bridge between the gap.

In the context of DiasporaEngager, the word Diaspora refers to anyone who, for any reason, is living in a country or town that is not his or her place of origin or ancestry or the place s/he calls home. Some people may call them an immigrant, a stranger, or an alien. Some may argue that most individuals can be remotely linked to a country of origin different from their current country of residence, and therefore, most of us are an alien, immigrant, or a Diaspora of somewhere. In the US for instance, except the native Indians, everyone else can be considered an alien or immigrant. Even in that case, the Indians themselves have had to migrate from somewhere before reaching the US.

The longer the duration of the stay of someone in a foreign land, the higher the likelihood that his or her descendants think that they (the descendants) are native of that place that their ancestry moved to long ago. That’s why, because they are not first, second, or third-generation immigrants, many people easily forget that they are a stranger of what they call “our land”, and unfortunately treat the new immigrants like the “bad people” or like “those who are taking our lands or our country”, or like “those who don’t even speak our language well”, or like “those who don’t behave like us”. In reality, those new immigrants (new arrivals) are usually just trying to go through the obligatory survival and integration steps that the ancestors of those who are calling them “strangers” and who think they are native, did long ago.

DiasporaEngager is not a political organization that is trying to advocate for any particular immigration agenda. To make a long story short, regardless of where we are from and where we are living, let’s try to help each other to succeed in this life on this earth. We never know what bad weather will come tomorrow or what may cause us to move in the future. We don’t know what is awaiting our descendants which may choose to move out from where we are today to another place. We don’t even fully understand where we are coming from and what brought our ancestors to where we are today. If you want to join us in our efforts to help diaspora members globally, please register an account on www.DiasporaEngager.com